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MARCHING IN

Had good intentions, started a post last night, hoping  to get in under the wire for February — but got sleepy and went to bed instead.  (So much for New Year’s resolutions!) Here’s a sketch of the month that was.

Ash Wednesday and Valentine’s Day, both on February 14th.  St. Margaret’s Church in the morning, and to Kieran’s in the afternoon, toting my (in)famous meatballs for dinner. Adorable grandchildren.  Hugs.  Kisses.  Bedtime stories.  Home with Nolan and Jack’s handmade valentines, now on refrigerator.

A lovely surprise visit from Kevin and Megan Jackson, on their way back from Villanova where Megan’s been accepted for September — had her pick of schools, of course. So good to see them again.  Not since her grandpa Ed Collins’s 80th birthday party last May.

Wonderful Debbie, of Sparkle Cleaning Service, came once more and made my condo shine, cheerfully humming while she works her magic. Last year I’d decided I’d earned this luxury — wish I’d done it sooner. Angel loves her, too, following her around the apartment for belly rubs and happy talk.

Entertaining Chinese New Year celebration at a Baltimore museum with the Gallagher Clan. Costumed youngsters performing intricate steps to drumbeats and ancient music.  Colorful dragons (two people inside) kicking and writhing around the floor, delighting the crowd.  Followed by a craft workshop, Nolan and Jack making party hats. Then a buffet lunch at a Nepalese restaurant.  Broadening my palate!?

Just in passing, a check-up at the dermatologist.  Still good to go in the skin I’m in. Always grateful for my excellent medical coverage.

Balmy weather the last days of February.  A preview of spring.  Angel and I have been enjoying leisurely strolls in Bynum Run Park and on the boardwalk at Havre de Grace.  A pleasure after recent record freezing temperatures.  Took short walks with Angel, both of us bundled up, me tugging on her leash:  “Let’s go home.  Mommy give you treat.”  That always works.

By the way, am thinking of retiring “The Perils…” after a random run of over six years. Want to concentrate on revising a couple of children’s stories I wrote long ago, and have been jotting down family memories, hopefully of interest to the younger generation.  Am now the third oldest:  My cousin, Jim Rogers, wins the gold at 96.  Cousin Patsy Beatty McNulty, earns the silver at 87.  And I get the bronze at 86.

Thank you for coming along with me on this bumpy ride.  Many blessings always to you and your loved ones.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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“THIS COULD BE THE START OF SOMETHING . . .”

Somehow November and December got away from me — Thanksgiving, shopping, cards, Christmas — didn’t get around to blogging.  Suddenly, it’s the first day of January. A brand new year.  We all get another chance to get it right.

Am dashing this off  at my family’s in Baltimore. A lot going on around me. This will be short and, hopefully, sweet.  Nolan playing a boisterous, imaginary game of Wii tennis. (Boggles my mind!) Jack, on his hands and knees, zooming a toy car around the floor, with sound effects.  Maeve busily toddling around with a doll, talking to herself. Bethany in the kitchen cooking. (I offered to help, but she declined, handed me a glass of wine.) Kieran working today at the nursing home, due home soon for dinner.  A real treat:  filet mignon on the grill.

Here’s to the Year of Our Lord 2018!  I wish you and yours many blessings — health, happiness, love, friends. Prosperity, too. We’ll get through the winter as we always have before.  More snow is predicted in Maryland tomorrow.  But the days are getting longer now.  It’s lighter a little later each evening.  Spring is coming.

By the way, Kieran talked me into Wii bowling with him and Nolan. I finally gave in, very reluctantly.  Had fun.  Scored 111.  Will do better next time.

 

 

 

 

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TRICK OR TREAT

It’ll be dark pretty soon, a little earlier every evening now.  Excited  children are getting  ready to go trick-or-treating.  Princesses, action heroes and heroines, all kinds of creepy creatures will be ringing doorbells, collecting hoards of candy.

There’ll probably be bonfires on beaches tonight.  Spooky stories told.  Apples bobbed for.  Does anyone still do that?  I hope so.  A messy highlight of my son’s costume party for third grade friends. He’d invited only boys — much to the annoyance of the girls in the class.  That was before he’d noticed their various charms.

Halloween’s origins can be traced back over 2,000 years to ancient Celtic harvest festivals, especially the Gaelic festival of Samhain, dedicated to remembering departed ancestors before the pagan new year began then on November 1st. In  the early Christian church, the celebration became known as All Hallows Evening (Hallows E’en) the eve of All Saints Day.  (Thank you, Wikipedia.)

Nowadays, there’s more scary stuff going around than “things that go bump in the night.”  More frightening than ghosts, mummies, skeletons, witches or zombies.  More terrifying than Norman Bates, Dracula, Freddy Kruger, Hannibal Lecter or Michael Myers.   Among them:  Climate tragedies.  Multiple mass shootings, Frequent terrorist attacks.  Threats of war and nuclear annihilation.

The fragile middle class is disappearing.  “The rich get rich and the poor get poorer” — remembering the devastating last Depression. Back to the bad old days when the lowly labored for the wealthy?  My 15-year-old Irish immigrant grandmother among them. Immigrants may be disappearing, too.

The Republicans’ trickle-down mantra has never worked before, and won’t work now. The magical solution evaporates on the way down, doesn’t reach the roots. The GOP is willing to overlook the travesty of a rude, crude, dishonest president who promised us a virtual rose garden, but only sows havoc and controversy.  As long as he signs their heartless agenda into law.

We’ve been tricked!

 

 

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SEPTEMBER MEMORIES

Thirty seven years and one week ago today, on September 19, 1970, Kieran John Gallagher and Eileen Marie Copeland were married at St. Mary Magdalene Church, in Springfield Gardens, New York. My sister, Mary, my maid of honor.  My brother, Bill, escorted me down the aisle.  Kieran’s brother, Kevin, his best man.  Six friends his ushers.

A memorable moment at the nuptial mass:  As the priest, citing the Wedding Feast at Cana, solemnly intoned: “And a miracle has been performed today!”  — a rumble of hearty laughter arose from the congregation.  (We were both 38 years of age.)  But I believe it was mostly my husband’s buddies  — he was the last of them to take the leap.

Followed by a reception at my home in Laurelton, tables set in the yard — on very damp grass. A gorgeous, sunny day — after torrents of rain the whole day before.  We’d decorated our finished basement, in case, and the food would be served buffet style in the dining room, but it would have been a crowded, cozy party. We hadn’t told my mom how many we’d invited, over 100, assuming there’d be refusals. There weren’t.  An open bar in the garage.  A strolling accordion player. Best party I ever attended.

Exactly three years later, on our third anniversary, September 19, 1973, I was admitted to Flushing Hospital, a Caesarean section scheduled the next morning.  And on September 20th, our son, Kieran Anthony, entered the world. I’ll always be grateful that, after the recovery room, a sweet nurse wheeled my gurney up to the nursery window to see my infant son.  “A perfect baby boy,” the doctor pronounced. Weighing in at seven pounds, seven ounces. His daddy, Kieran John, came to visit, carrying a dozen red roses, with a card that read:  “Wow a boy!” Would have loved a girl, too.  But couldn’t help saying that!?

Kieran Anthony celebrated his 44th birthday last week.  And he and Bethany are now daddy and mommy to Nolan, Jack and Maeve.   Making memories every day.

 

 

 

 

 

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HOME ON THE RANGE

Not the kind “where the buffalo roam,” in that sentimental song of the old West — the kind that cooks — what I still call a stove.  Last week the oven died in the gas range in my condo kitchen.  Had tried self-cleaning, which didn’t work, and after that, neither did the oven.  Can’t be without an oven to bake my Irish soda breads and apple pies with homemade crusts.  (My mom always enjoyed her little pun:  “Eileen, you’ve got some crust!”)

I’m convinced that many appliances, along with some other modern conveniences, have gotten way too complicated  — for me, anyway.  Though I have a basic cell phone, dabble on the Internet,  and get money (too often) from an ATM.  My husband wouldn’t touch any of them — he didn’t like to be rushed, was deliberate in his movements.  Speed and dexterity are necessary now — fingers flying over smart phones.

I remember watching my Grandma Beatty in her kitchen as she calmly turned out delicious Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners for about 25 — herself, grandpa, aunts, uncles and cousins — cooking turkeys and all the fixings in a wood stove, throwing in big chunks to keep the fire burning evenly.  Kids fed first, then pretty much left on our own, chasing each other, playing games, sliding down the banister, boy cousins taking turns riding up and down in the hallway dumbwaiter — girls only allowed to keep watch for adults.

Wish we could go back to the days when families were closer, in both senses — wouldn’t want to go back to  wood stoves.  But do newfangled ones have to be so daunting?  The range was an older one, wasn’t worth repairing — $100 for the service call. Went to Home Depot, sales people scarce, none anywhere near appliance area. Only three gas ranges on display.  Finally ordered one a rare sales rep found on computer, to be delivered in several days, with later installation. With vision of stove sitting in my living room for a while, next day called and cancelled.

But now there’s a brand new Whirlpool gas range (4-1/2 stars out of 5) in my kitchen — reasonable price, black and stainless steel, 5 burners, a griddle, bought at Best Buy, where a helpful salesman approached as soon as I began to browse.   Delivered in two days, old range removed, new one immediately connected. All smooth sailing so far.  Not for long.

A 31 page Care and Use Guide came with the stove, 16 in English, then in French.  Had a quick lesson from installer, decided to bake Pillsbury buttermilk biscuits.  Mouth watering, put them on cookie sheet, tried to set oven temperature and timer, pressed digital control panel in proper places. But didn’t press Start button within 5 allotted seconds, 3 seconds to lock in. Finally got it right, but wouldn’t unlock when I wanted to correct the temperature.

Called Best Buy — “Press Lock for three more seconds to unlock” —  on page 8 of  manual, which made my brain hurt. The biscuits were delicious, and I dunked them in homemade chicken soup for lunch.  Yesterday, I treated myself to bacon and eggs cooked on the griddle — left some egg for Angel to lick off. Then discovered Low setting on front burners was defective — flame too high. Repair coming Friday. I rest my case.

 

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BRIEF ENCOUNTERS

This morning, on the way to WaWa for my customary French vanilla decaf coffee, plain donut for dunking, and “The [real news] Washington Post,” I turned on Tredmore Road and saw a curious sight — a woman and two young children, sitting on folding chairs near the curb, holding up small handwritten signs. Couldn’t make out the message as I drove by — probably young entrepreneurs offering refreshments on a hot summer day, with mom supervising sales.

As I came near, all three held up the signs, hopeful smiles fading as I kept going. Felt a twinge — sorry I’d passed them by — decided to stop on the way back.  A boy about five — he reminded me of my grandson Nolan — and his sister, maybe six, were selling ice pops for a dollar, though none were in evidence.  And it was their aunt who’d encouraged the project while their mom visited their new baby sister in the hospital, kept there because of complications at birth.

I asked for an orange and an apple ice, gave each child a dollar, and they filled the order in the garage where the pops were kept frozen. I was their first and only customer, said the aunt.  They’d been discouraged and had started to walk away when I arrived. Now they were delighted, both beaming and dancing around, waving the money. The boy  suddenly ran and gave me an enthusiastic hug.  Worth more than a dollar.  Priceless.

This afternoon Angel and I visited Havre d’Grace again for a walk on the boardwalk, water for her and a coffee ice cream float for me at the Promenade Cafe. After, we relaxed in a gazebo,  met a retired kindergarten teacher, Myrtle, and her son Charley, who proudly told me: “Today’s my mom’s 103rd birthday!” His mother added emphatically: “And I’m in very good health!” Which she certainly seemed to be.  Charley told me he’s had cancer three times, last time seven years ago, when doctors said he’d only live three months.

You never know who’ll you meet when you stop along the way.  Or what you’ll learn if you do.

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STILL HANGING IN THERE

Recently realized it’s been three months since I wrote “Out Like a Lion.” And suddenly it’s the Fourth of July — time flies whether or not fun is involved — and I wanted to send my loyal, intrepid followers greetings and good wishes on this anniversary of our nation’s independence.

This year we had a four day celebration since today’s a Tuesday — and we needed every one of them, many of us weary of the constant turmoil  in Washington and the world. Our so-called president seems more unhinged every day while his fans still adore him.

Outrageous tweets.  Bizarre behavior. Alternate “facts,” Health care plans on life support.  Environmental protections dismantled. The Russian question. And more. Our founding fathers would be scandalized and horrified.  And we have to worry about Putin in Russia.  Kim Jong-un in North Korea.  Conflict and unrest in so many countries.

Time for Angel and me to go to bed.  She’s got an early vet appointment in the morning.  Blood work for her Cushing’s disease.  But she’s doing well, thankfully, now about 10 years of age. When we found each other three years ago at Fallston Animal Rescue Movement, they said she was about seven then.

Sorry to say I’ve had another bout of depression, back in Sheppard Pratt again in June.  Out in time for Nolan and Jack’s shared 5th and 3rd birthday party in a park — 20 kids, parents, pizza, pinatas, masks. And Maeve will be one year old on July 15th.  So good to be home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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